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The Zen of Yarn-Winding

Its been over a year since I blogged about something worthwhile here. First off, thank you all my wonderful blog readers. Without you, I probably would have been tempted to shut this thing off.

What prompted me to write this particular one though was an experience in yarn winding that I just went through.

The yarn in question for this post comes from a major brand. The skeins I had wound till date,had absolutely no issues, but this one had twists and turns from the moment I put it on the winder.

So step 1 was to unravel about a meter and see if the rest will follow nicely. After a point, it seemed that the crisis was over and the yarn will go smoothly from here on. unfortunately, a moment later, the yarn was stuck. And stuck how! The yarn had looped back and forth on itself. Which meant that even if I cut the strand (which i was severely tempted to do), I would end up cutting every single turn for god knows how long.

The solution was to find the other end and wind by hand, while ensuring the winder doesn’t turn. grrrr!! Then started the slow and painstaking process of unwinding, while going through every single curse and abuse in my vocabulary. The final step was to wind the yarn from the hand-wound ball into the half-done one on the winder. So eventually a work which should have been done in under 5 minutes, took close to 25.

Towards the end I found myself irritated because I found that I ran out of abuses and all the languages I knew (4 of them). And then came my epiphany: the amount of learning I got from this exercise of unwinding yarn.

  1. I don’t mind if the cheapie acrylic I get here has n number of knots and tangles. I will bear that as the cost of buying cheap yarn.
    • However, expensive yarn is NOT allowed to have the same problem.
  2. I was able to get over the first desire to snip at he yarn and found an 2nd solution ie winding the other end by hand.
  3. I was standing and working the swift and yarn by hand, which counts as exercise.
  4. I realized that I need to learn a new language, one that can be easily pronounced and learnt. (It will make the abuses easier to learn).
  5. Learnt to be thankful for the next skein which got done in under a minute, thanks to no tangles.
  6. Even more thankful when the next yarn bag had already wound skeins (thanks to the sender).
  7. I finally got around to this blog! 😉

I do hope my little blog post made you at least smile! 🙂

 

2 thoughts on “The Zen of Yarn-Winding

  1. Oh, so very true. It makes one think of the lessons in life we all could learn, IF we would only stop and think. Thanks for the reminder!

    1. thank you for the lovely words! 🙂

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